Caffe Bene Himalayan Traverse Expedition 2016 in Nepal
Kinabalu One-day ascent , 23 August 2013. David makes the first 1-day mobility-impaired climb of Borneo's summit
Qinghai Virgin Peaks Expedition 2012: Tackling 6000m virgin peaks in the Tanggulashan area of Qinghai, China
1st Singapore Everest Expedition: online dispatches of the landmark 1st Singapore Mt Everest Expedition, led by David Lim
Aconcagua 2000: David Lim and Tok Beng Cheong tackle the Polish Traverse in Feb 2000, as part of David's comeback climb from disability
Tien Shan Expedition 2000: David and members of the 2001 Everest Expedition lead and trained a team of novices in the first ever Singapore expedit...
Ojos Del Salado - Chile 2001: The Everest 2001 Expedition’s major warm-up climb prior to the Everest climb in 2001.
Singapore-Latin American Everest Expedition 2001: A climb on the North Rodge of Mt Everest, led by David Lim
Climbing the fabled Mount Ararat in 2001: ” I was fascinated by the tale of Noah’s Ark since I was a kid. In 1986 I took the opportunity to tra...
Ascent 8000: Expedition to Cho Oyu and Shishapangma, two 8000m peaks in 2002 by disabled Singaporean mountaineer David Lim
Alpine Rock in Borneo -2010:Why We Need Heroes: Climbing with Borneo alpine rock with Sir Chris Bonington, the legendary British mountaineer.
Extreme Desert Crossing 2007:David and Shani make the 5th ever recorded crossing on foot of the Salar de Uyuni
The “Spirit of Singapore Expedition 2009”, makes 3 virgin peak ascents including the tough peak later named Majulah Peak
Iran Expedition 2006: Multi-peak ascents in Alam-Kooh, and a climb of the long north ridge of Damavand in the Alborz peaks.
Ojos del Salado 2005: The highest volcano in the world --"Of my many adventures and climbs worldwide, there are a few which taught me the lesson t...
Nike Timing Mt. Fuji Climb 2004: David, Ting Sern and Masaharu make an attempt on Mt Fuji in the winter from the Yoshida trailhead.
Mountain of the Star Expedition 2003: An all-disabled mountaineers’ ascent of Pico de Orizaba, 5700m, Mexico’s highest peak and North America...
Maccoffee Tienshan Virgin Peaks Expedition: David leads his team to make the first virgin peak ascents by a Southeast Asian expedition. The team cl...
Kilimanjaro 2011: David Lim returns to Kilimanjaro to climb it from the Rongai Route.
Elbrus 2003: Climbing highest summit of Europe - in 2003. David teams up with Grant and Rudolf in Russia...
Kilimanjaro Challenge 2004: Four disabled mountaineers atempt a remote route on the northern icefields of Mount Kilimanjaro (5895m), the summit of ...

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Big smiles before we begin our climb


Jamie. It is a wonder seeing him climb.


En route to the summit. The team is on the rim of Kilimanjaro


On the Summit at 3pm. It was a 23 hrs day of climbing.

Wed 7 Jan 2004, Nairobi

Africa! Here at last in sunny Nairobi. Temperatures at 22 degrees C make it very mild even when thesun is shining. We’re picking up the rest of the team at 8pm and then heading for a big pow-wow and eats at the famous Carnivore restaurant where three items are on the menu: Meat, meat and meat. Tomorrow , we leave for the Tanzania border and Moshi, our base of operations for Kilimanjaro. En route, we’ll stop at lunchtime at the Upendo Leprosy Centre to see the place and meet the good people that we have been in contact with for 2 years

Word from our operators say a lot of rain has been about ( unseasonal ). That means a good dusting of snow on the mountain – which should make it less icy on our desired route – a good sign

Crocodile steak anyone?
Checking out,
David


Friday, 9 Jan 2004, Machame Camp, 3,000m

We are on the trail! Our walk began at Machame Gate, a short way from Machame Village, a small community at 1,500m. Reached 3,000m after trudging up the Machame Route for about 5 hours through mountain rainforests. Tomorrow we will make our way through scrubland to Shira Camp where we will rest and acclimatise. Tonight, we camp here at Machame Camp, which is on the Shira Plateau. The route here was nice, the plants and cool air reminds me of the route up Mt Kinabalu in Sabah. We are all warming up our muscles and gearing up for the climb ahead. All are well !

David


11 Jan 2004, Shira Plateau, 3,800m

We spent the day hiking and acclimatising. We did a 4 hour hike today. Tomorrow, we will be climbing up to Lava Tower which is at 4,600m. The weather here is challenging. Mornings begin with clear skies, great climbing weather. But for the afternoons, we see clouds moving in and everything gets moist and damp.

The last few days have been interesting for all of us. We are getting to know each other’s strengths and weaknesses. Each of us have different impairments and this has been a learning experience. Each of us struggle against our own limitations everyday. And in spite of it, all of us are in great shape both physically and mentally. (BTW : We have not run out of our stock of bad jokes yet!)

David


12 Jan 2004, Lava Tower Camp, 4600m

Reached Lava Tower after 4 hours of hiking. It’s lunch time here, about 1:30pm Kilimanjaro time. Nothing much to eat except trail food. Where is that impala steak when you need one.

We are all in good shape, a bit of sore muscles and a few blisters. We are in good health. Jamie, says to tell all that he is fine and doing well. Pete, wants meat too.

There are some Austrians here at Lava Tower Camp too, they seem impressed by our trekking skills. They ain’t seen nothing yet… :) The views here are great, offering us a good look at the glacier route that we planned to take. Tomorrow, we will rest and acclimatise at this altitude.

David


13 Jan 2004, Moir Hut, 4,200m

We woke up to a wet and cloudy day today, it rain sporadically during the rest of the day. We ended up rather moist and damp, and a bit gamey. Spent a rather uncomfortable night at Lava Tower Camp. We didn’t sleep too well so we decided to move down today to about 4,200m and set up accommodations for the night. At a lower altitude, we hope that we will get our required beauty sleep… :) We are now at Moir Hut, a small campsite midway between Lava Tower Camp and Shira Camp. This trail requires some climbing over scree slopes and boulders. A bit tiring.

Tomorrow, we will begin the tough part of the climb. We will make our way to the base of Credner or Penck glaciers. Then, we plan to spend some time acclimatising and planning our next move. We anticipate steep climbing over snow and rocks, it will challenge every one of us. On the 16th, we will attempt the glacier route and if everything goes well, 17th Jan will be summit day.

We are all feeling a bit tired today, because of a lack of sleep last night. Other than that, we are all OK. All our limbs are holding up to the punishment. We look forward to some hard climbing tomorrow.

David


15 Jan 2004, 3800m Shira Camp

It was a bit eventful yesterday. Paul developed a mild case of altitude sickness. So we moved down further to Shira Camp at 3,800m for the night. He seems better this morning.

Yesterday, Pete and I, went for a hike up to Credner Glacier from Shira Camp after moving with the rest for the team down to Shira Camp. We climbed up about 500 vertical meters to about 4,610m, reaching the edge of the glacier, before it started raining and snowing. Visibility was limited as the clouds came down. Looking at the wicked terrain there, our conclusion was that we have to take the Western Breach route instead of the Credner Glacier. The alternative plan.

It just stopped raining, and it looks like a fine morning today. Our next move will be to move up to Lava Tower Camp again before making a summit attempt. Everyone have had a good rest last night. We still think a steak would be good for dinner…. :)

David


17 Jan 2004, morning, 4,600m, Lava Tower Camp

We left Shira Camp and made our way up to Lava Tower Camp yesterday. Some other climbers went up to Credner Glacier yesterday for a look, and I think they found the going there tough too.

Spent the night here. It started raining and snowing yesterday and it kept on going for about 15 hours. Last night, you would see us huddled around feeling rather morose, damp and cold. It was a cold night and because of the rain and snow, much of our stuff’s frozen this morning. Lava Tower Camp is now covered with about 3 inches of snow. The hill in front of us looks covered with more snow, and we might be ploughing through as much as 12 inches of snow higher up.

The sun’s up this morning and around camp, you will see us hanging our delicates up to dry in the bright sun :) . Morale’s up too, a change from last night’s low.

Our plan now is to get some of our stuff dry, make our way up to Arrow Glacier which is about 200 vertical meters above us. This should be a 2 hours hike. Rest at Arrow Glacier and we will begin our summit attempt at about midnight tonight.

David


18 Jan 2004, 3pm, 5,895m Kibo

All of us reached the summit, it is now 3pm. It has been a long hard climb up but it is worth it. The view is fantastic, breathtaking. We are the only team on the summit. Standing on the top of Kilimanjaro has been a challenge, the scree and snow gave us a bit of difficulty. The sun’s still shinning and it is a beautiful day. We now face the prospect of a long descent down the mountain. Our plan is to descent and camp at Karanga Hut.

David


19 Jan 2004, Karanga Hut

From the summit, Kibo, we descended 1,400m down to camp and rest. We took a different route, going down the other side of the mountain. We started our descend at about 3pm and we stopped just before midnight, making it a 23 hour day, from ascent to descent. In between, we chewed a few cereal bars. We were looking very hungry when we finally stopped. Tired… and dehydrated. Did the necessary, boil water, drink, boil more water, drink some more and eat some stuff before crawling to rest in the tent. All of us felt great from the climb. Tired but good.

Our next move will be to leave the mountain via Mweka Gate and then off to Moshi town for a good wash and fresh meat!! slurp.

David


20 Jan 2004, 2pm (Singapore), 3,000m Mweka Camp

It’s morning here. We are packing up and moving down to Mweka Gate and then catch a ride to Moshi town. Long last, a hot bath and food. We hope to reach Moshi by tonight. Lots of aching muscles but we are happy. The local press seems taken by our expedition. I take it that they have never seen a more motley group of disabled climbers before.

David


Wed Jan 21, 2004, Media Release

The Voltaren Kilimanjaro Challenge succeeded in climbing to Africa’s summit, Mt Kilimanjaro on Jan 18th scoring a possible first in placing an international team of four disabled climbers on top.

A variety of setbacks from unseasonal bad weather to illness forced the team to abandon its original plan to climb the straightforward but remote Credner Glacier. Instead, the team focused on the Western Breach route, a more approachable route but one with a steep face; laced with rock steps and cliffs. The preceding week’s bad weather had plastered Kilimanjaro with a thick coating of snow; giving the peak an unusual icing. No other teams were on the route that day.

Leaving their 4800m camp at 0100hrs , they climbed through most of the night on the 18th; reaching the summit crater rim ( 5700m ) between 1030 – 1100hrs. From here, Uhuru ( the main summit of Kilimanjaro ) was reached at around 1500hrs in good conditions. The team helped each other where personal physical impairments caused some difficulties at the technical sections.

Messrs Pete Steane, Jamie Andrew, David Lim and Paul Pritchard descended from the summit at 1600hrs and began a gruelling seven-hour descend into the darkness to their Karanga campsite on the southeastern side of the mountain. The whole summit day took 23 hours. Dehydrated and tired from the climb, the team pulled into the campsite at about 0030 hrs, Jan 19th.

The team have returned to their respective countries, with Messrs Paul Pritchard and Pete Steane transiting in Singapore on Jan 25th prior to their return to Australia.

The climb has been covered extensively in the world media including:

BBC Worldservice (Jan 9)
CNN (Jan 13, Jan 19)

The Times ( UK ) Jan 12
The Scotsman ( UK ) Jan 23
The Straits Times ( Singapore ) Jan 7, 24
Streats ( Singapore ) Jan 6
Channelnewsasia Jan 23
Arusha Times ( Tanzania ) Jan 17-23
The Daily Nation ( Kenya ) Jan 23
EverestNews.com

The team thanks it supporters:
Voltaren Emulgel [ Novartis OTC ( Asia Pacific ) ],
and Reuters Foundation;

With support from:
Marmot,
DMM,
Canon,
Emirates Airlines,
Mountain Designs,
Black Diamond Equipment,
Nike Timing.
Sandisk and
Ad Idem Productions

The Voltaren Kilimanjaro Challenge 2004 decided to assist one charity in the locality of Mt Kilimanjaro. The choice of a home where many suffer from a disabling condition made Upendo the top choice. Together with funds from the Reuters Foundation and funds the team has raiised from lectures and talks from the UK to Australia, it is hoped the lives of those at Upendo can be improved. About US$5000 has been raised.

The India-made, manual milk separator

An urgent need was to generate more income in their self-sufficiency drive. Their cows produced milk, which sold, derived some income. But by sourcing for and funding (amongst other things) of several hand-cranked milk separators, the centre could increase their income by selling both milk , and (higher valued) cream; with potential for producing other dairy products.


THE UPENDO LEPROSY CENTRE STORY

Faye Cran

Arusha being the gateway to the National Parks attracts beggars from all over the country. About 120 leprosy victims & families, who because of their disability were unable to obtain employment, lived under the trees on the banks of the river that runs through the centre of Arusha Town and existed by begging and scavenging. Their sustenance from begging was far from sufficient and their condition was pathetic and squalid, without even a pit latrine. Their bed was the hard ground.

In 1995 while I was Director of Vocational Services our Club was approached by these lepers requesting help. We arranged a meal and the issuing of clothes to them. We found they were so grateful and in such need that we conceived the idea of building a shelter for these social outcasts.

A few days later I went to a local market to buy dog meat. Outside squatting in the mud and dressed in filthy tattered rags was a man. He had no fingers, but managed somehow to hold a raw and nearly meatless bone, which had been thrown to him where he sat amongst the stray dogs looking for pickings. He was hungry and desperate with haunted eyes as he sat gnawing the bone.

What could cause anyone to loose every scrap of dignity and be reduced to this state? The answer of course is leprosy, and Joel, for that is his name, was not the only victim. A qualified kindergarten teacher he had lost his job together with his fingers and toes to this dreadful disease. This appalling scene increased the urgency to help these people. (He was one of our first residents. Now he is once again clean and smart living at Upendo. He has indeed come a long way since that day.)

In 1996, by coincidence, I met with Ab Moore from the Rotary Club of Guelph, who was visiting Moshi. I told him about this project and he travelled to Arusha to see for himself the plight of these unfortunates. Ab immediately became involved and started his own fund raising through the Rotary Club of Guelph, CRCID, and Rotary International. Later through his efforts all the furniture, except for the beds was obtained. St Francis Leprosy Guild in the U.K donated the beds and mattresses.

On 1st May 1996 the Arusha Rotarians and their families pushed a golf cart from the Town Centre to Kilimanjaro Airport some 55 kms. It took 12 hours and raised $16,600 sufficient funds to construct the Home.

And so Upendo became a reality. In June 1996 the first residents moved in. On 2nd October 1996 we officially opened Upendo – which translated means ‘cared for with love’ and was the name chosen by the first residents.

When the lepers arrive they are in very poor condition. They are emaciated, not only by lack of food, but also, because the treatment for leprosy spoils their immune system, they suffer from scabies, dreadful ulcers, diarrhoea, coughs and eye infections. Medical bills are high – there is no National Health in Tanzania.

At Upendo we accept the whole family – hence children who used to beg and would have ended on the streets have a secure home with their parents. Currently we have 50 adults and 31 children. Thankfully the people with children never leave the home, whereas a few of the others, once the leprosy is under control, intend to go away and only return when the leprosy ‘flares up”. We have 3 men who have lost their sight though leprosy, Anton can make rope and twine, Elias trained as a carpenter can make school desks, while Pili is able to weave baskets. All have found security and ‘upendo’ in the home.

The older children attend primary school for the first time in their lives and a kindergarten teacher comes daily to entertain the younger ones.

After school, training in life skills such as tailoring, masonry and carpentry are offered. These are taken up with enthusiasm. Some 300 desks and forms have been donated to needy schools – these were all made during carpentry lessons, which also includes baby cots, tables, cupboards, lockers, double decker beds (they have made 20 sets this year for our street girl dormitory) and even rocking zebras, hippo swings, African drums and many other items.

The adults learn animal husbandry and horticulture. They are self sustaining in eggs, milk, fish and vegetables.

Other activities include hand loom weaving, maize grinding, a small shop and handicrafts such as embroidery, recycled paper cards, papier machie beads, bowls and Christmas decorations as well as Christmas Crackers.

The creation of the Upendo Leprosy Victims Rehabilitation and Self Reliance Centre in such a short time and literally out of nothing was achieved in large measure by the consistent encouragement and material support of a network of people around the world.

St Francis Leprosy Guild, together with the Rotary Clubs of Guelph, Canmore and New Zealand were the first to recognise what could be possible in bringing hope and dignity to those afflicted with the age-old disease of leprosy. In numerous ways of personal commitment and inspiration they have ensured that they provided essential timely and continuing assistance helping bring Upendo to where it is today.

Over 5000 cases of leprosy were discovered in Tanzania last year. Thankfully many were found early and cured because they were discovered in time. We hope and believe that our little children’s story Fire Fire played a part in passing the good news that early treatment cures leprosy.

PLEASE CONTACT MS. FAYE CRAN TO SEE HOW YOU CAN ASSIST

The Voltaren Kilimanjaro Challenge 2004 Team will be using the Voltaen Emulgel to ease the inevitable aches and strains caused by expedition rigours
If you’re into exercise, sport or do outdoor work, you’ll know the pain caused by sprains, strains, muscle aches and pains can leave you feeling stiff and sore. But you don’t have to suffer through it. There is something you can do about it.

Voltaren Emulgel contains an anti inflammatory agent with analgesic properties. It is a topical non-greasy gel that soothes and cools on application. The powerful active ingredient in Voltaren Emulgel is proven to reduce swelling and ease the pain of soft tissue injury.

Voltaren Emulgel has a pleasant smell and won’t stain clothing. So when you are trying to manage the pain of a sprain or strain, don’t put up with it. Instead ask your local pharmacy for Voltaren Emulgel. Available without a prescription.

Voltaren Emulgel for the temporary relief of local pain and inflammation. Always read the label. Use only as directed. If symptoms persist, see your pharmacist. Use only as directed. Novartis Consumer Health Australasia Pty Ltd. ABN 46 004 535 513. Registered Trademark.


Marmot’s reputation over 27 years has been founded on the firm belief and proven knowledge that they are a quality-driven company. They design and produce outdoor clothing and equipment to be simpler, easier to use, more comfortable, more durable, lighter, and at the same time, of the highest quality and better value.

Everything they produce is suppported by their lifetime warranty “Marmot For Life”.

Marmot today is based in Santa Rosa, California, run and owned by its employees. We at Mountain Works are very proud to represent Marmot in the UK.

The Voltaren Kilimanjaro Challenge 2004 will be using a variety of sleeping bags and equipment made by Marmot including the Thor expedition-strength tent.

 


Reuters Foundation is a humanitarian and educational trust, primarilly founded by Reuters, the global news, information and technology group. It’s work reflects the values and concerns of the comapny and it;s employees. It focuses in particular on areas where Reuters skills and expertise in information gathering, technology and communications can be put to use in ways which will benefit the communities in which Reuters work worldwide and which will reflect well on Reuters.


DMM Wales are assisting the Voltaren Kilimanjaro Challenge 2004 with climbing hardware and ropes; including the nickel-plated, ergonomic Revolution ice-screws ( see picture inset ).

Many thanks to Emirates Air for providing excess baggage services support and waivers for the team.


David Lim is personally supported by  cameras (Singapore) and Nike Timing and will be using a Canon 300D SLR, 6-million pixel camera to capture the best of the expedition on digital images. Sandisk Extreme CF cards will be themain memory storage medium. A Nike Oregon Alti Compass watch will give barometric and altimeter readings.

Support also comes from Team Management Systems (TMS) Australia is recognized as the foremost integrated system of work based, research proven assessments and feedback instruments worldwide. TMS profiling instruments are used extensively by human performance and leadership organisations such as Everest Business Consulting.

Paul Pritchard and Pete Steane have also been supported through the generosity of Black Diamond for their Whippet ski/ice-axe poles, and also Mountain Designs, producers of fine Australian outdoor and mountaineering equipment.

 

The Mountain, The Story, The Route, Special Thanks

The Mountain

Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain in Africa, located in northeast Tanzania, near the Kenya border. Kilimanjaro is an extinct volcano, and is one of the most massive in the world. It towers 5000m above the surrounding plains, and much of its surface is over 5500m Beneath its ice dome, snow extends down long gullies that have been eroded in the mountain sides. It was only ‘discovered’ by explorers from the west in 1848.

Kilimanjaro’s summit crater, known as Kibo, measures nearly one kilometre across. The highest point on Kibo’s steep rim is Uhuru, the highest peak in Africa, at 5895m. Deep in the center of Kibo is a smaller , 200m crater. The summit was successfully climbd for the first time in 1889 by Meye and Purtscheller.


The Story

David Lim, the project organiser, had the germ of an idea to undertake a climbing expedition with an all-disabled team of mountaineers in Oct 2000; subsequent to a UIAA General Assembly that he attended. The intention of the climb was to highlight the abilities, rather than the disabilities of people burdened with handicaps.

The project moved along with members invited and objectives sifted through. Ultimately, an unsupported climb on one of Kilimanjaro’s remote northern icefields was selected. Very few recorded ascents are known and almost no information on these routes are available online. The ascent was to have taken place in Jan 2003 but personal issues in the team led to the project postponed by another year.


The Route

The team will rendezvous in Nairobi, with Jamie Andrew flying from Britain and the rest of the team from Tasmania and Singapore.

The team will take a route via the Shira Plateau in the direction of the Arrow Glacier/ Western Breach area. This is part of the classic Shira route. A total of 9 climbing days have been allocated ( versus the usual six days ) to allow for route-finding and the fact that members of the climbing team are disabled. The team hopes to climb unsupported on the final four days from the terminus of either the Penck Glacier systems or the Credner Glacier. See the possible route options above.


Special Thanks

The team thanks Doug Hardy, Ph.D. of the Dept. of Geosciences, Morrill Science Center, University of Massachusetts for invaluable information on the conditions and potential routes in the northern icefield areas.

 

5 1/2 hands, 5 1/2 feet for four men – a strange combination from around the world; united by a common history of personal adversity and a quest for a route to Africa’s summit

Paul Pritchard – UK.Well known extreme climber. Now hemiplegic from his 1998 accident on the Totem Pole, a sea stack off the Australian coast. Has limited control over his right side. Paul is also known for receiving the prestigious Boardman and Tasker Prize for Mountain Literature twice (for Deep Play, 1997 and The Totem Pole, 1999). His past specialty in extreme rock climbs on alpine peaks included a new route on the 1200 meter East Face of Central Tower in the Torre de Paine, Patagonia. At grade VI, 5.10, A4, the route’s name, EL REGALO DE MWOMA, translates from the Patagonian native Tehuelche Indian language, “A Gift from God”.


David Lim – Singapore. Best known in Asia for leading the 1st Singapore Everest Expedition in 1998, his 50 alpine and expedition ascents have included many climbs in the French, Swiss and NZ Alps; as well as the Andes. He summitted Cho Oyu ( 8201m ) in 1997. In 1998, shortly after returning from Everest, he contracted the rare nerve disorder Guillain-Barre Syndrome, and was totally paralysed for many months. Now partially disabled in his right leg and left hand. His comeback climbs have included a successful 2-man, alpine-style ascent of the Polish Traverse on Aconcagua, leading the 2001 Singapore-Latin American Everest Tibet Expedition, and a lightweight attempt on two 8000m-peaks. He is author of Mountain to Climb, and Against Giants


Pete Steane – Australia. Hails from the island of Tasmania. In 1982 he sustained a rock-climbing accident where a piece of climbing equipment pierced his spine. He now lives with permanent nerve damage and walks and climbs with the help of two leg braces. A teached by profession, Pete has climbed on the rock faces of Yosemite National Park ( USA ) and in the New Zealand Alps.


Jamie Andrew – Scotland. An accomplished technical alpinist, he suffered severe frostbite when he was trapped by blizzard conditions near Chamonix in January 1999.He and friend Jamie Fisher became trapped 4000m up on the north face of the Droites in the Mont Blanc area. Rescuers were unable to get to them for several days and by the time they were eventually plucked off the ridge Jamie Fisher was dead. Doctors were forced to amputate Mr Andrew’s hands and feet which had been damaged beyond repair by the ravages of frostbite.

He became the first quadruple amputee to scale Ben Nevis in 2000.


Film Team:

Slackjaw Productions have been making films for six years mostly in the field of climbing and mountaineering. Their list of projects include the seminal Hard Grit, Stick It, Stone Love, Blood Sweat and Bagels, One Winter, Safety in Mountains, Meltdown – Crisis in the Himalaya and Splinter. In the process they have garnered eighteen awards on the International Mountan Film Festival Circuit. They have also sold footage and done free-lance work for many TV networks.

The Kilimanjaro film team comprises the director/videographer pair of Richard Heap (above) and Benedict Bevan-Pritchard (below)

 

 


Top: Pete Steane and Paul Pritchard in a Sep 13 feature for the Mercury newspaper. Photo by Raoul Kochanowski Top: Dave Lim and Jamie Andrew meeting for the first time in Glasgow, Jul 2001 Top: Look Mom! No hands or feet. Jamie showing how it’s done in the Swiss Alps. A spot of rock climbing in summer 2003. Top: Hundreds of metres, high on the steep rock of EL Capitan (USA), the Slackjaw Productions team shows some lofty commitment to the ideal of filming climbing expeditions.

 

 

An international climb in Jan 2004, featuring four disabled mountaineers attempting a remote route on the northern icefields of Mount Kilimanjaro (5895m), the summit of Africa.
Patron: Sir Chris Bonington

Supported by:


 

April 2007 Update: Slackjaw Productions of the documentary of the expedition, Kilimanjaro: Going For Broke – won the 2006 Jean-Marc Boivin Award at the International Adventure Film Festival in Dijon. The award was based on ” authenticity of adventure”

Wed Jan 21, 2004, Media Release

The Voltaren Kilimanjaro Challenge succeeded in climbing to Africa’s summit, Mt Kilimanjaro on Jan 18th scoring a possible first in placing an international team of all- disabled climbers on top.

A variety of setbacks from unseasonal bad weather to illness forced the team to abandon its original plan to climb the straightforward but remote Credner Glacier. Instead, the team focused on the Western Breach route, a more approachable route but one with a steep face; laced with rock steps and cliffs. The preceding week’s bad weather had plastered Kilimanjaro with a thick coating of snow; giving the peak an unusual icing. No other teams were on the route that day.

Leaving their 4800m camp at 0100hrs , they climbed through most of the night on the 18th; reaching the summit crater rim ( 5700m ) between 1030 – 1100hrs. From here, Uhuru ( the main summit of Kilimanjaro ) was reached at around 1500hrs in good conditions. The team helped each other where personal physical impairments caused some difficulties at the technical sections.

Messrs Pete Steane, Jamie Andrew, David Lim and Paul Pritchard descended from the summit at 1600hrs and began a gruelling seven-hour descend into the darkness to their Karanga campsite on the southeastern side of the mountain. The whole summit day took 23 hours. Dehydrated and tired from the climb, the team pulled into the campsite at about 0030 hrs, Jan 19th.

The team have returned to their respective countries, with Messrs Paul Pritchard and Pete Steane transiting in Singapore on Jan 25th prior to their return to Australia.

The climb has been covered extensively in the world media including:

BBC Worldservice (Jan 9)
CNN (Jan 13, Jan 19)

The Times ( UK ) Jan 12
The Scotsman ( UK ) Jan 23
The Straits Times ( Singapore ) Jan 7, 24
Streats ( Singapore ) Jan 6
Channelnewsasia Jan 23
Arusha Times ( Tanzania ) Jan 17-23
The Daily Nation ( Kenya ) Jan 23
EverestNews.com

The team thanks it supporters:

Voltaren Emulgel [ Novartis OTC ( Asia Pacific ) ]
and Reuters Foundation;

With support from:

Marmot,
DMM,
Canon,
Emirates Airlines,
Mountain Designs,
Black Diamond Equipment,
Nike Timing.
Sandisk and
Ad Idem Productions